Special Feature: Conan Doyle for the Defense: The True Story of a Sensational British Murder, a Quest for Justice, and the World’s Most Famous Detective Writer by Margalit Fox

I think it’s safe to say that most of us have heard of Sherlock Holmes and his famous creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

So what do we know about Conan Doyle beyond his famous detective? For me—nothing. Conan Doyle was clearly a crime buff and had a unique mind for solving mysteries but I didn’t know that he actually helped solve a real life murder!

When this book came up for review, I was so bummed that I couldn’t fit it into my summer reading—fortunately I am going to review it in October for my mystery month so be watching for that. I couldn’t let the summer go by and not give my readers a little preview for what sounds like an outstanding piece of non-fiction! It’s on sale NOW so be sure to pick up a copy for yourself!

In this thrilling true-crime procedural, the creator of Sherlock Holmes uses his unparalleled detective skills to exonerate a German Jew wrongly convicted of murder.

For all the scores of biographies of Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the most famous detective in the world, there is no recent book that tells this remarkable story–in which Conan Doyle becomes a real-life detective on an actual murder case. In Conan Doyle for the Defense, Margalit Fox takes us step by step inside Conan Doyle’s investigative process and illuminates a murder mystery that is also a morality play for our time–a story of ethnic, religious, and anti-immigrant bias.

In 1908, a wealthy woman was brutally murdered in her Glasgow home. The police found a convenient suspect in Oscar Slater–an immigrant Jewish cardsharp–who, despite his obvious innocence, was tried, convicted, and consigned to life at hard labor in a brutal Scottish prison. Conan Doyle, already world famous as the creator of Sherlock Holmes, was outraged by this injustice and became obsessed with the case. Using the methods of his most famous character, he scoured trial transcripts, newspaper accounts, and eyewitness statements, meticulously noting myriad holes, inconsistencies, and outright fabrications by police and prosecutors. Finally, in 1927, his work won Slater’s freedom.

Margalit Fox, a celebrated longtime writer for The New York Times, has “a nose for interesting facts, the ability to construct a taut narrative arc, and a Dickens-level gift for concisely conveying personality” (Kathryn Schulz, New York). In Conan Doyle for the Defense, she immerses readers in the science of Edwardian crime detection and illuminates a watershed moment in the history of forensics, when reflexive prejudice began to be replaced by reason and the scientific method.

Advance praise for Conan Doyle for the Defense

“I cannot speak too highly of this remarkable book, which entirely captivated me with its rich attention to detail, its intelligence and elegant phrasing, and, most of all, its nail-biting excitement.”–Simon Winchester, author of The Perfectionists and The Professor and the Madman

“Fox brings to life a forgotten cause c�l�bre in this page-turning account of how mystery writer-turned-real life sleuth Arthur Conan Doyle helped exonerate a man who was wrongfully convicted of murder. . . . The author’s exhaustive research and balanced analysis make this a definitive account, with pertinent repercussions for our times.”Publishers Weekly (starred review)

About the Author:

A senior writer at The New York Times, MARGALIT FOX is considered one the foremost explanatory writers and literary stylists in American journalism. As a member of the newspaper’s celebrated Obituary News Department, she has written the front-page public sendoffs of some of the leading cultural figures of our age. (Conan Doyle for the Defense is in many ways a fond belated obituary—for the long-overlooked Oscar Slater, an immigrant Everyman treated inexcusably by history.) Fox’s previous book, The Riddle of the Labyrinth, won the William Saroyan Prize for International Writing. She lives in Manhattan with her husband, the writer and critic George Robinson.

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