Review: The Victory Garden by Rhys Bowen

I stopped reading the review pitch once I saw ‘WWI’ in the description, which was basically the first line in the summary. I have read a lot of stand alone novels by Bowen and have been impressed with her writing and historical research.

Her stand alone books have mostly been set in WWII, but WWI is truly my favorite period in historical fiction, so seeing that this book was set during that time earned this book and instant and enthusiastic, ‘yes’ from me.

I have consistently enjoyed reading Bowen’s books, whether they are one of her historical mysteries or her stand alone novels. She as an incredible gift for writing vastly different content and managing to keep all of her heroines fresh and interesting. Continue reading “Review: The Victory Garden by Rhys Bowen”

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Review: Among the Red Stars by Gwen C. Katz

For some reason, this year I have heard about a couple of books that came out or are coming out, about the Night Witches of WWII. I hadn’t read any of the books but I was interested in the subject matter and historical take on these brave women.

I wanted to pick up one of the, what I like to call, Night Witches books but I just didn’t think of it when I was at the bookstore or my library. Then one day in late November I got an email pitching this book featuring the Night Witches that was more of a YA book and I practically pounced on the request!

From a historical stand point, I think anything about the Russian Night Witches, is incredibly important and interesting, but my reading year was coming to a close and I didn’t really want to read anything overly taxing and long, so when I saw that this book was geared toward a more YA audience, I was eager to review it.

World War II has erupted in Valka’s homeland of Russia, and Valka is determined to help the effort. She’s a pilot—and a good one—so she eagerly joins an all-female bomber regiment.  Continue reading “Review: Among the Red Stars by Gwen C. Katz”

Review: The Girl They Left Behind by Roxanne Veletzos

This book is marketed to fans of Sarah’s Key and The Lilac Girls as well as fans of WWII family sagas. I was intrigued by the subject matter as well as the time period. As many of you know, I love war time books—mysteries, romances, family dramas etc—-so this book, historically fit right in.

But what stood out for me was the plot for two main characters—–Natalia and Victor split apart by time and war. I loved the idea of seeing two characters from the same region having to pick sides during a war time occupation.

I was interested to see how that scenario would pan out, so that’s how this book ended up on my review schedule for October. Continue reading “Review: The Girl They Left Behind by Roxanne Veletzos”

Review: Treacherous Is the Night (Verity Kent #2) by Anna Lee Huber

Full disclosure, I’ve been a huge fan of Anna Lee Huber for years. I absolutely love all of her books and I can’t get enough of the heroines, mysteries, and of course the covers! The Verity Kent series is no different.

I read the first book in the Verity Kent series earlier this year and I loved it! It was an interesting start to a different type of heroine for Huber. I was eager to see what else was in store for Verity in this latest book in the series.

In 1919 England, in the shadow of The Great War, many look to the spirit world for answers. But it will take an all too earthbound intrigue to draw in the discerning heroine of Anna Lee Huber’s latest mystery.

It’s not that Verity Kent doesn’t sympathize with those eager to make contact with lost loved ones. After all, she once believed herself a war widow. But now that she’s discovered Sidney is very much alive, Verity is having enough trouble connecting with her estranged husband, never mind the dead. Continue reading “Review: Treacherous Is the Night (Verity Kent #2) by Anna Lee Huber”

Review: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

I am late to the party with this one. I bought this book when it first came out and it literally sat on my shelf for years. Many times I almost gave it away because I figured I would probably never read it.

It was once of those books that looked good at the time and had a great cover but the title was long and just sounded weird. Yet I bought it anyway.

Then the Netflix movie came out and everyone was raving about this book all over my social medial platforms. It was once again everywhere and everyone wanted to read it so I decided to jump on the bandwagon and read it before watching the movie.

January 1946: Writer Juliet Ashton receives a letter from a stranger, a founding member of the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. And so begins a remarkable tale of the island of Guernsey during the German occupation, and of a society as extraordinary as its name (summary from Goodreads).  Continue reading “Review: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows”