Review: Mrs Boots Goes to War by Deborah Carr

Last year I read the first book in the ‘Mrs Boots’ books, titled Mrs Boots. I loved it and couldn’t wait to read the next book but then somewhere along the way I must have missed the second book. This one then came up for review (this third book) and I instantly realized that I must have missed book two (I thought this one was book two).

I should have probably set this one down and gone back to read the second book so that I could fully understand the scope of the story and all that had happened from book one until now, but I didn’t. It took me a few chapters to realize I missed a book but by that point I was already wrapped up in the book 3 story that I just kept reading.

If you love historical fiction, the Ms Boots books are wonderful. They have rich historical details as well as a wonderful story. I felt like these books could be read as stand-alones, I mean I inadvertently skipped around, but I am going to go back and read book two because they are so well written and full of historical detail that’s interesting and fun.

Summary

The world is at war and her country needs her.

When Florence’s son, John, announces that he has enlisted, she is horrified but determined to hold her family together during the oncoming hardships they are to face.

Men are returning to England wounded, with many more not returning at all, families are struggling, and Florence’s ‘Dear Girls’ are risking their lives in new and dangerous jobs. Florence might be older now, but she has no intention of sitting back on her laurels while others fight for King and Country. She knows what needs to be done…

Review

WWI is my absolute favorite time period for historical fiction. I mean the Victorian era has a special place in my heart but WWI really marks a massive social shift and I love seeing how that unfolds in historical fiction books like this one. I think that is one of the big reasons why I didn’t put this book down when I realized it was the third book in the series instead of the second. I was already wrapped up in the time period and how the war was impacting Florence and her family that I just kept reading. Deborah Carr does a marvelous job bringing this time period to life.

Florence was such a great character throughout this series. I loved her in the first book, but in this one her compassion and caring really came through. I loved how this book focused on the contributions that Boots made to the war effort and providing care to the soldiers. It was interesting for me and one of the reasons I enjoyed the first book. I don’t really know much about the family and the pharmaceutical empire so it was cool to read and learn about.

While I might have picked this one up out of sequence, I think the author does a fantastic job getting readers caught up with all the things they might have missed in previous books. I don’t think that readers will feel lost in the story and this could stand alone but for me I loved seeing the character and historical development from book one until this one. If you can read the books in order then do, but if not it’s not a deal breaker I don’t think. While this book has a lot of history to dwell on, it doesn’t feel ‘history heavy’ which I think is great for readers. There’s enough to sink your teeth into if you are a history fan but there is plenty of character development and plot for readers who maybe like less history and more plot. Either way this is a great series and I think readers will love it!

Book Info and Rating

Kindle Edition

Published February 19, 2021, One More Chapter

ASIN : B08NV16CQT

Free review copy provided y publisher, One More Chapter, in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own and in no way influenced.

Rating: 4 stars

Genre: historical fiction

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